Tag: Visiting the Upper West Side

American Folk Art Museum                                    2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets)                                         New York, NY 10023

American Folk Art Museum 2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets) New York, NY 10023

American Folk Art Museum

2 Lincoln Square (Columbus Avenue between 65th and 66th Streets)

New York, NY 10023

(212) 595-9533

https://folkartmuseum.org/

Open: Sunday 12:00pm-6:00pm/Monday Closed/Tuesday-Thursday 11:30am-7:30pm/Friday 12:00pm-7:30pm/Saturday 11:30am-7:30pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d266582-Reviews-American_Folk_Art_Museum-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

I recently visited the American Folk Art Museum in New York City for the “Made in New York City” exhibition and it is a very interesting and engaging museum. The artwork for the museum was a combination of painting, sculpture, pottery and metal work created at different periods of the City’s history. It really showed the extent of manufacturing in New York City and the craftsmanship that was once here.

American Folk Art Museum Made in New York II

The paintings of Colonial New York

Some of the interesting things you will see are the paintings by artists in both Colonial New York and from the Hudson River School of prominent New Yorkers through its first 200 years of history. You will see how the styles of art have changed over the years.

Also there is a lot of metal work in the ways of signs and rods for the front of doors and for the roofs. The woodwork carvings that once graced the front doors of merchants all over the City is now a lost art. Here you could see the works of German and Russian carvers and the craftsmanship that was put into every piece. It was interesting too to see the racial themes and stereotypes that were used in the art.

American Folk Art Museum Made in New York

Wood Carvings and Metal work in the “Made in New York City” exhibition

Another program that the museum does well is they have afternoon Jazz Wednesdays and Free Concerts on Friday nights. There are family programs, walking tours, curator talks and lectures as part of the museum programming so there is something for everyone.

The American Folk Art Mission:

Since 1961, the American Folk Art Museum has been shaping the understanding of art by the self-taught through its exhibitions, publications and educational programs. As a center of scholarship and by showcasing the creativity of individuals whose singular talents have been refined through experience rather than formal artistic training, the museum considers the historical, social and artistic context of American culture. Its collection includes more than seven thousand artworks dating from the eighteenth century to the present, from compelling portraits and dazzling quilts to powerful works by living self-taught artists in a variety of mediums (Museum bio).

Self-Taught art, past and present, tells empowering stories of everyday life. The field of American folk art was first defined at the turn of the twentieth century by collectors, professional artists, critics, dealers and curators whose search for an authentic American Art seemed to be finally answered in works that presented a nuanced  of national identity, faith, progress, ingenuity, community and individuality. Under the umbrella of “folk art” expanded to also include artists working in the present. For the last twenty years, the term self-taught has more regularly come to address these artists, whose inspiration emerges from unsuspected paths and unconventional places, giving voice to individuals who may be situated outside the social mainstream. Those individuals have been active participants in the shaping of American visual culture, influencing generations  of artists and establishing lively artistic traditions (Museum History).

American Folk Art Museum History:

The museum of Early American Folk Arts as it was known initially held its first exhibition in a rented space on 49 West 53rd Street in 1961. The museum’s collection was launched in 1962 with the gift of a gate in the form of an American flag, celebrating the nation’s centennial. The gift reflected the museum’s early focus on eighteenth and nineteenth century vernacular arts from the northeast America.

In 1966, after receiving a permanent charter, the museum expanded its name and mission. As the Museum of American Folk Arts, it looked beyond the traditional definitions of American folk art. Its exhibitions and collection began to reflect “every aspect of the folk arts in America-north, south, east and west.” Founding curator Herbert W. Hemphill Jr. “expanded the notion of folk art beyond traditional, utilitarian and communal expressions.” Under his direction, the museum began to champion idiosyncratic and individualistic artwork from the fields of traditional and contemporary folk art. In doing so, the museum ushered in a new era in the field of twentieth-century folk art (Museum History).

The 1990’s brought new focus to the diversity and multiculturalism of American Folk Art. Offering a more inclusive vision. the museum began to present African American and Latino artworks in their exhibitions and permanent collections. Director Gerard C. Wertikin announced American folk art’s common heritage as “promoting an appreciation of diversity in a way that does not foster ethnic chauvinism or racial division.” (Museum History).

The museum further established  its broadened outlook with the 1998 formation of the Contemporary  Center, a division of the museum devoted to the work of 20th and 21st century self-taught artists as well as non-American artworks in the tradition of European art brut. In 2001, the museum opened the Henry Darger Center to house 24 self-taught artist’s works as well as a collection of his books, tracings, drawing and source materials (Museum History).

American Folk Art Museum

The new home of the American Folk Art Museum

In 2001, the museum chose its current name, American Folk Art Museum. Recognizing that American Fold Art could be fully understood in an international context, the word American functions as an indication of the museum’s location, emphasis and principal patronage rather than as a limitation on  the kind of art it collects, interprets or presents. The museum’s current programming reflects this shift in focus. Past exhibits have included folk arts of Latin America, England, Norway, among other countries and continents (Museum history).

Don’t miss this amazing little museum on the Upper West Side of Manhattan.

 

 

 

New York Historical Society Museum & Library 170 Central Park West                                        New York, NY 10024

New York Historical Society Museum & Library 170 Central Park West New York, NY 10024

New York Historical Society Museum & Library

170 Central Park West

New York, NY   10024

(212) 873-3400

http://www.nyhistory.org

@nyhistory

https://www.nyhistory.org/

Open: Sunday 11:00am-5:00pm/Monday Closed/Tuesday-Thursday 10:00am-6:00pm/Friday 10:00am-8:00pm/Saturday 10:00am-6:00pm

Fee: Adults $21.00/Seniors & Educators $16.00/Students $13.00/Children (5-13) $6.00/Children (4 and under) Free

On Fridays from 6:00pm-8:00pm are pay as you wish for Museum Admission

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d136143-Reviews-New_York_Historical_Society_Museum_Library-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

 

I have visited the New York Historical Society several times over the years and I have to say that make quite a statement on the history of New York City and the State of New York City. It has a interesting permanent collection of paintings and statuary. There are a lot of things that First Families of New York City have donated to the museum that tell the story of families born and raised here.

I was honored here years ago when a picture I took for the 9/11 Photo Album Book came out in 2002. All the photographers that contributed to it were in attendance. Another time I was here for a private event on John Adams back in the early 2000’s that was injunction with the American Museum of Natural History. Over the years, the Historical Society has brought in more interesting exhibitions. The current exhibition “Hudson Rising” on the history and ecological changes due to humans along the Hudson River. It was an interesting look of the natural changes to the river from manufacturing times today as the river is being reclaimed for recreational uses.

Hudson Rising Exhibition

‘Hudson Rising’ Exhibition

The whole museum is a retrospect on the timeline of the New York City with an array of art out any one time. There are Masters from the Hudson River School, statues from all eras and special exhibitions that tell an interesting story of some part of the City’s past.

NY Historical Society

Hudson River School Paintings for ‘Hudson Rising’

History of the NY Historical Society:

The Historical Society was founded on November 20, 1804 largely through the efforts of John Pintard. He was for some years secretary of the American Academy of Fine Arts as well as the founder of New York’s First Savings Bank. With a group of prominent group of New Yorkers on the founding board including then Mayor DeWitt Clinton, the organization was established on December 10, 1804 (Wiki).

New York Historical Society II

The Collections of the NY Historical Society

The NY Historical Society had its share of growing pains over the years in that it had been in heavy debt during its first couple of decades. It also moved several times over the years as well. It moved from the Government House, which it had been housed in since 1809 to the New York Institution, the formerly the city almshouse on City Hall Park in 1816. In 1857, it moved into the first building constructed specifically for its collection at Second Avenue and 11th Street. The collection moved to its final home to Central Park West in 1908 (Wiki).

The current Society building was designed by architects York & Sawyer, who were known for bank designs. The second part of the building was designed by architects Walker and Gillette. The building has just finished a $65 million dollar renovation in 2011 and all the galleries have been refreshed. The new director of the Society, Louise Mirrer is leading the establishment into the 21st Century.

New York Historical Society

On Friday night’s from 6:00pm-8:00pm it is ‘pay as you wish’ to enter the museum.

 

Asia Society and Museum                                    725 Park Avenue at 70th Street                         New York, NY 10021

Asia Society and Museum 725 Park Avenue at 70th Street New York, NY 10021

Asia Society & Museum

725 Park Avenue At 70th Street

New York, NY 10021

(212) 288-6400

AsiaSociety.org/NY

https://asiasociety.org/new-york

Open:

Museum: Tuesday-Sunday-11:00am-6:00pm, Friday-11:00am-9:00pm

Asia Store: Monday-Sunday-11:00am-6:00pm, Friday-11:00am-9:00pm

Garden Court Cafe: Tuesday-Sunday, 11:30am-3:00pm; Reservations: (212) 570-5202

Asia Society is closed on major holidays. Please check AsiaSociety.org/NY for updates on museum, store and cafe hours.

Fee: $12.00 Adults/$10.00 Seniors/$7.00 Students with ID/Free to members and children under 16/Free Admission Fridays, 6:00pm-9:00pm

Adult, Student and Teacher tours:

For information or to schedule a tour, call (212) 327-9237

*Wheelchair accessible/available for use during visits

*Complimentary cell phone audio tour available

*Assistive listening devices and headsets available for many programs.

 

TripAdvisor Review:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d531995-Reviews-Asia_Society_and_Museum_Garden_Court_Cafe-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

 

History of the Museum:

Asia Society II

John D. Rockefeller 3rd (1906-1978) , who established Asia Society in 1956, firmly believed that art was an indispensable tool for understanding societies. From 1963 to 1978, he and his wife, Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller (1909-1992), worked with art historian Sherman E. Lee (1918-2008) as an advisor to build the Mr. and Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection, which was later bequeathed to Asia Society.

Asian Society Museum

The Rockefeller Collection

The group of spectacular historical objects they assembled-including sculpture, painting and decorative arts-became the core of the Asia Society Museum Collection and is world renowned. The Collection, now consisting of approximately 300 pieces, is distinguished by the high proportion of acclaimed masterpieces, to which additional high-quality gifts and acquisitions have been added since the original bequest to Asia Society. The Collection has particular strengths in Chinese ceramics of the Song and Ming periods, Chola-period Indian bronzes and Southeast Asian sculptures.

Extraordinary examples of decorative art in the acclaimed Asia Society Museum collection include a number of superior East Asian ceramics, which make up more than one-third of the Collection. A luminous pair of twelfth-century Korean bowl and saucer sets, covered with the celebrated celadon glaze of the Goryeo period and an extraordinary tea leaf jar, decorated with mynah birds and accented with silver by Japanese ceramic artist Nonomura Ninsei (active ca. 1646-1677) are among the ceramic highlights.

Asia Society III

Walking around the museum

An exquisite solid silver Chinese stem up that dates to the late seventh or early eighth century also stands out as an exceptional masterpiece of decorative art within the Collection. The skill of the craftsman is evident in the fine embossing, chasing and engraving of the birds, flowers and scrolling vines on the exterior of the cup.

Two other great strengths of the Collection are Hindu and Buddhist sculpture from South and Southeast Asia. An eleventh-century processional sculpture of the elephant-headed Hindu deity Ganesha is an endearing example produced by the South Indian master bronze casters at that time and one of the fifteen important Chola-period bronzes in the Collection.

Another great treasure is a rare eighth-century inscribed and dated inlaid-brass crowned Buddha seated on a lotus rising from water inhabited by serpent deities (nagas) from Kashmir or northern Pakistan. A sculpture of the serene and slender Buddhist Bodhisattva Maitrya stands just over an impressive three-feet tall and represents the pinnacle of Thai metal casting during the eighth-century.

These objects and the Asia Society Museum Collection as a whole continue to be an important means for sharing the talent, imagination, and deep history of the peoples of Asia with audiences all over the world.

(From: Masterpieces from the Asia Society Museum Collection)

We are …Policy

With top-level experts and advisors-including former heads of state and cabinet officials, CEOs, civil society leaders and scholars-the Asia Society Policy Institute creates solutions that advance Asia’s prosperity, security and sustainability. Its projects include working to strengthen regional security institutions and mechanisms in Asia, assessing the impact of China’s rise and tracking its economic reform program, recommending pathways to an inclusive and high-standard Asian trade architecture, charting a path for India’s admission to APEC and designing strategies for Northeast Asian economics to link carbon markets and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

The Asia Society Center on U.S. China Relations seeks to build mutual understanding between the two countries through projects and events on policy, culture, business, media, economics, energy and the environment.

We are…Arts

Transforming Americans understanding of Asia through exhibitions and performing arts was at the heart of our founder’s vision. The bequest of the Mr. & Mrs. John D. Rockefeller 3rd Collection of traditional Asian art in 1979 spurred the building of our New York headquarters. Today, our ground-breaking exhibitions of traditional, modern and contemporary art-as well as performing arts, film and author programs-are presented to the highest acclaim at our centers in New York, Hong Kong and Houston and at venues all over the world. Global initiatives such as the Arts & Museum Summit bring together museum and cultural leaders from across Asia, the United States and Europe further appreciation of Asian arts.

Asia Society I

The gift shop at the Asia Society

We are …Education

A rising Asia requires a rising generation of students to understand its cultures and complexities. The Center for Global Education at Asia Society has developed an internationally recognized approach to foster the global competence of students, aiming to improve the capacity of 100,000 educators to instill global competence in 4 million youth by 2030. We partner with leaders and institutions from around the world to transform teaching and develop global-ready students. We also lead a major effort to bring Mandarin language instruction and the study of China and Chinese culture to children in the United States and to bring global learning to American after school programs, in pursuit of best practices in global education.

(From Asia Society pamphlet)

Asia Society is a non-profit, nonpartisan organization offering dynamic public programming at our cultural centers in New York, Hong Kong and Houston and at our other global locations in the United States, Asia and Europe.

Asia Society appreciates the support of its members, who aid our vital mission of preparing Asians and Americans for a shared future. For more information, AsiaSociety.org.

Disclaimer: This information was taken directly from the pamphlets from the Asia Society in New York City. I give them full credit for all the information. Please see the above hours and programs and call the above numbers for more information.

Bard Graduate Center Gallery                               18 West 86th Street                                             New York, NY 10024

Bard Graduate Center Gallery 18 West 86th Street New York, NY 10024

Bard Graduate Center Gallery

18 West 86th Street

New York, NY  10024

(212) 501-3023

gallery@bgc.bard.edu

https://www.bgc.bard.edu/gallery/27/exhibitions

https://www.bgc.bard.edu/gallery/

Open: Tuesday, Friday-Sunday: 11:00am-5:00pm/Wednesday-Thursday: 11:00am-8:00pm/Closed on major holidays

Fee: Free Admission Hours on all Wednesdays and Thursday evenings from 5:00pm-8:00pm.

December 26th (Boxing Day) : Free

General Admission: $7.00 and Students & Seniors (65+): $5.00

Subway: B, C, and 1 to West 86th Street

TripAdvisor Review:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d309306-Reviews-The_Bard_Graduate_Center-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

I took some time out from “MywalkinManhattan” project to visit the Bard Gallery for the afternoon and was pleasantly surprised by this little ‘gem’ located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. This Graduate Center focuses on small exhibitions with interesting themes and not so over-whelming shows that tax your brain like some of the bigger museums in New York City.

Bard Gallery

The entrance to the Bard Art Galley

Their exhibitions are compact and detailed on the subject matter and the objects they have on display are interesting. They also have lectures and gallery talks for more detail on their displays.

The Bard Graduate Center Gallery, founded in 1993, occupies a six story townhouse near Central Park West and houses not just the gallery but the academic programs, lecture hall and library. The center has pioneering exhibitions on decorative arts, design history and material culture. The research driven exhibitions are organized with leading scholars, curators and institutions worldwide and showcase a rich array of objects comprised of loans from public and private collections, many never before on view in New York City.

Bard Art Gallery

Walking the permanent collection

With a commitment to investigating under-recognized topics in the history of design, the exhibitions provide a critical framework for understanding the context in which historical and contemporary objects were made, used, collected and displayed. These lead to a fuller understanding of the present through the lens of the past (Bard College website).

Bard Art Gallery III

A full slate of public and research programs, public tours and opportunities for school groups and educators compliment each exhibition. Video and new media interactives enrich the visitor experience in educators compliment each exhibition (Museum website).

Bard Art Gallery II

The Bard Graduate Center: Decorative Arts, Design History, Material Culture is a graduate research institute and gallery located on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. It is affiliated with Bard College, located in Annadale-on-Hudson, NY. The gallery occupies a six story townhouse  at the 18 West 86th Street location while the academic building and library are located at 38 West 86th Street.

Students at Bard Graduate Center focus on the study of the cultural history of the material world. The institution is committed to the encyclopedic study of things, drawing on methodologies and approaches from art and design history, economic and cultural history and history of technology, philosophy, anthropology and archaeology.

Students enrolled in the M.A. and PhD. programs work closely with a distinguished faculty of active scholars in exploring the interrelationships between works of art and craft, design, places, ideas and social and cultural practice in courses ranging from antiquity to the 21st century (Wiki Bard College site).