Tag: Walk Manhattan

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery  245 East 54th Street  New York, NY 10022

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery 245 East 54th Street New York, NY 10022

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery

245 East 54th  Street

New York, NY  10022

(212) 752-4340

http://www.artanddesignhs.org/

https://insideschools.org/school/02M630

Open: Seasonal when school is open and only at certain times of the year

Fee: Free-check in with the security guard

 

I passed the High School of Art & Design when I was touring the Turtle Bay neighborhood in Manhattan for my blog, MywalkinManhattan.com. The school was open during the Spring Break and some of the kids were in the school were taking classes. The security guard let me walk around and then he asked me would I like the see the art gallery. I said sure and I was able to explore the John B. Kenny Gallery.

John B. Kenny was Ceramist and an administrator who saved the school and created the school with three other artists in 1936. He founded the school with artists Henry Cordes, Mildred Harston and Jerod Magon.

High School of Art & Design V

The School History:

https://www.biblio.com/the-complete-book-of-pottery-by-kenny-john-b/work/59670

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/598110/pdf

 

 

The School Mission Statement:

The Mission of the High School of Art & Design is to inspire, educate and fully prepare our gifted students to become exceptional artists. Through a unified curriculum that incorporates a broad spectrum of disciplines integrating art, technology and academics, our students are prepared to go on to college and careers with industry-standard mastery in the major of their choice.

With a commitment to promoting strong ethical values and professional demeanor, we strive to foster a sense of community among our students, staff and parents. We are dedicated to engendering student’s productive, creative and innovative participation in the world of visual arts as concerned and caring citizens of the global community (School Mission Statement).

John B. Kenny artist

John B. Kenny artist

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/242318.John_B_Kenny

The Gallery is full with Alumni and student art and it revolves at various times of the year. It is a nice size gallery full of interesting art. There was a combination of sculpture, painting and paper sculpture in the gallery.

High School of Art and Design Gallery Show

The John B. Kenny Gallery is very interesting

I was only able to spend a short time in the gallery but it is a hidden gem tucked in the side of the main entrance and just talk to the security guards at the front of the school and they will let you tour on your own.

Check it out when the school reopens in the Fall.

 

Studio in a School NYC Gallery                     1 East 53rd Street New York, NY 10022

Studio in a School NYC Gallery 1 East 53rd Street New York, NY 10022

Studio in a School NYC Gallery LLC.

1 East 53rd Street

New York, NY  10022

(212) 459-1455

Home Page

Studio Institute

Studio in a School

Open: Sunday & Saturday Closed/Monday-Friday 8:00am-7:00pm

Fee: Free

My review on TripAdvisor:

 

 

1 East 53rd Street

The entrance to the Gallery is at 1 East 53rd Street

I came across this little gallery full of Public School K-12 art when walking around the Upper East Side for my walking project, “MywalkinManhattan.com” This small gallery space in the lobby of 1 East 53rd Street has a revolving exhibition of works from students in schools all over New York City.

Studio in the School Gallery IV

The revolving art at the Studio in a School Gallery is unique.

The art gallery revolves its art at different times of the year and you get to see the students creativity. There are paintings, sculptures and paperwork objects. It is amazing to see the talent the students have at all ages.

Studio in the School Gallery

These kids have talent

The best part of the gallery is that it is free. Just don’t try to go past the security guards at the desk and you will be fine. Take time to look at the over-hanging paper sculptures. They are very unique. Almost like a surrealist kite.

What is also nice is that it is free and only takes about 45 minutes to get through the whole gallery so it is a nice place to visit on a rainy day or on lunch hour.

 

Congratulations to the student artists.

History of the Studio in a School:

Studio in a School fosters the creative and intellectual development of New York City youth through quality visual arts program, directed by arts professionals. The organizer also collaborates with and develops the ability of those who provide or support arts programming and creative development for youth both in and outside of schools.

Studio in a School serves young people by integrating the visual arts into teaching and learning and provides professional development for artists and teachers.

In 1977, during a financial crisis in New York City, public school arts education budgets were dramatically cut. In response, Agnes Gund, philanthropist and President Emerita of The Museum of Modern Art, founded Studio in a School.

Today, under Ms. Gund’s leadership, together with the support of many, our programs continue to thrive, bringing visual arts education taught by professional artists to students in New York City and beyond. We fulfill out mission through two divisions: the NYC Schools Program, offering programs for students in Pre-K through high school and the Studio Institute, which shares professional learning, partnership programs, arts internships and research grants in local and national forums.

Disclaimer: This information was taken from the Studio in a School website and I give them full credit for the information.

Fort Tryon Park  Riverside Drive to Broadway  New York, NY 10040

Fort Tryon Park Riverside Drive to Broadway New York, NY 10040

Fort Tyron Park

Riverside Drive to Broadway

New York, NY  10040

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/fort-tryon-park

https://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/fort-tryon-park/history

Open: Sunday-Saturday 6:00am-1:00am

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d2305249-Reviews-Fort_Tryon_Park-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

 

I love Fort Tryon Park in Upper Manhattan. It is one of the most beautiful parks in New York City. It is a park of rolling hills, stone paths that hug the hills, interesting garden that are ablaze when in season, shady tree sitting areas and is home to many playgrounds and the Cloisters Museum which is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It has so much to offer a visitor coming into Manhattan from exploring the woods that line the path to looking at interesting art at the museum. This 67 acre park is one of the interesting and complex in New York City.

Cloisters III

A city view of the beauty of the park by the Hudson River

When you enter the park from Inwood by Broadway, you enter through Ann Loftus Park which is named after a local community leader and is one of the popular parks with kids and families in the area. In the summer months, the fountains and water fixtures are going strong and the kids run around them while the parents lie under shade trees talking to one another.

Ann Loftus Playground

Ann Loftus Playground

Anne Loftus Playground

When taking the path from Ann Loftus Park and winding up the hills of woods and rock formations is the Hudson River looming in the distance with spectacular views of the Palisades and the large cliffs of Fort Lee, NJ on the other side.

At the top of hill like a crown jewel is the Medieval Galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Cloisters Museum. Filled with all the Met’s collections of Religious and Medieval art set into themes of old churches, stained glass windows, flowered courtyards and vistas of the river, it is the perfect place to wonder around.

Cloisters

The Met-Cloisters Museum

Don’t miss the “Hunt of the Unicorn” tapestries.

Cloisters II

The Hunt of the Unicorn Tapestry

The Cloisters:

https://www.metmuseum.org/visit/plan-your-visit/met-cloisters

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d106609-Reviews-The_Met_Cloisters-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

 

As you pass the Cloisters and walk further in to the park, there is still so much more to see and do. The Linden Terrace overlooks the Hudson River with its large shade trees over head and its stone benches to sit and just look in the distance or read a book. This was the site of the original Fort Tryon and is the highest location in the park.

Fort Tryon Park III

Linden Terrace is a nice place to relax and read a book

https://www.forttryonparktrust.org/sites/david-rockefeller-linden-terrace/

Further down in the other entrance of the park is Heather Garden, a large path of flowers , bushes and trees with benches lining it. The garden was the Olmstead Brothers when the park was taking shape and is a beautiful place to walk in the Spring and Summer months when the park is in full bloom.

Fort Tryon Park IV

The Heather Garden was recently remodeled to follow the original design by the Olmstead Brothers.

https://www.forttryonparktrust.org/the-gardens-heather-and-alpine/

There is even a terrace restaurant in the middle of the park, the New Leaf Cafe (See review on TripAdvisor) which sits off to the side of the Corbin Circle on the other side of the park. The food is over-rated and very expensive. The last time I ate there the menu was pretty standard. It is a great to take out of towners who want a view of something. It is not worth the trip. The views are nice and in the summer months it is pretty but the food and service are standard.

Fort Tryon Park-New Leaf Cafe

The New Leaf Cafe in Fort Tyron Park

New Leaf Restaurant and Bar

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g60763-d478282-Reviews-New_Leaf_Restaurant_Bar-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

The park has so much to offer in all months of the year especially in the Spring and Summer.

History of Fort Tryon Park:

The area was known by the local Lennape Indians as Chquaesgeck and by the Dutch settlers as Lange Bergh (Long Hill). During the Revolutionary War, the Battle of Fort Washington was fought on this site. The park is built on a high formation of Manhattan schist with igneous intrusions and glacial striations from the last Ice Age (Wiki).

John D. Rockefeller Jr. bought up most the land in 1917, which by that point had been old estates, to create Fort Tryon Park. He hired the Olmstead Brothers firm, under the direction of Fredrick Law Olmstead Jr., the son of the designer of Central Park,  to design the park and James W. Dawson to create a planting plan. Mr. Rockefeller also bought the collection of Medieval art from sculptor George Gray Barnard and it was the cornerstone of The Cloisters Museum which was built in 1939 (Wiki).

Through the years the park has seen its ups and downs especially in the 1970’s and 80’s with the decline of fiances in New York City. There were extensive renovations when fiances got better in the late 90’s and parts of the park were fully renovated. The Fort Tyron Park Trust, a non-profit organization was founded in 1998 to help maintain the park (Wiki).

Today it is just an amazing park!

 

The Met Breuer   945 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10021

The Met Breuer 945 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10021

The Met Breuer-Metropolitan Museum of Art

945 Madison Avenue

New York, NY  10021

(212) 535-7710

https://www.metmuseum.org/visit/plan-your-visit/met-breuer

https://www.metmuseum.org/visit/audio-guide/the-met-breuer

https://www.florabarnyc.com/

Open: Sunday 10:00am-5:30pm/Monday Closed/Tuesday-Thursday 10:00am-5:30pm/Friday & Saturday 10:00am-9:00pm

Fee: Adults $25.00/Seniors $17.00/Students $12.00/Members and Patrons Free/Children under 12 Free

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d10062261-Reviews-The_Met_Breuer-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

The Met Breuer is an interesting museum. When it was opened, the museum wanted to have more of focus in recent contemporary artists. The Metropolitan Museum of Art had been known for emphasis in the classical and ancient arts and its collections of art that covered the centuries. Even though it has a very impressive Contemporary Art Collection in the main building at 1000 Fifth Avenue, it was not one of their stronger collections. The Museum of Modern Art had been known more for that. The opening of the Met Breuer was going to change that by showing more of the permanent collection and traveling shows with cutting edge artists of the Twentieth and Twenty-First  Century.

I have been to the museum several time for private Member’s Nights and most recently in March 2020 for the Gerhard Richter exhibition “Gerhard Richter: Painting After All” (the exhibition just opened as the New York City closed down for the viral outbreak).

Gerhard Ritcher artist

Artist Gerhard Richter

https://www.gerhard-richter.com/en/

https://www.gerhard-richter.com/en/art

The artist who was born in Germany and raised during the outbreak of World War II began his career as an artist in the 1960’s. He was accepted into the Academy of Arts in the 1950’s and his career has spanned many different mediums and concepts of art as shown in the exhibition.

Met Breuer IV

The abstract works of artist Gerhard Richter

Met Breuer V Gerhard Richter

Artist Gerhard Richter in his studio

The Membership was able to walk four of the floors of the artists work and join in discussions with the curators and docents on duty. Each floor that evening was dedicated to a different concept of the artist’s work.

Met Breuer III

The exhibition has only opened to the membership before the museum shut down due to the virus outbreak.

On the bottom floor basement area of the museum is the restaurant, Florence, named after Florence Whitney, a patron of the museum after which was named after her family. The restaurant which has a very contemporary and expensive menu was packed that night. The restaurant offers nice views of neighborhood street level and has a very nice bar.

Met Breuer Florence Bar

Florence Restaurant & Bar

https://www.florabarnyc.com/

On the main floor of the museum is a small gift shop.

Mer Breuer II

The lobby of the Met Breuer

 

The History of The Met Breuer:

The Met Breuer was the brainchild of philanthropist Leonard Lauder in 2008 when it was announced that the Whitney Museum was moving to a new building downtown. The agreement was signed between the Met and the Whitney for the new museum in 2011.

Met Breuer VI Gerhard Richter

Gerhard Richter’s work on the third floor of the museum

The Met Breuer opened in March of 2016 in the building that was formerly occupied by the Whitney Museum of American Art. The building was designed by architect Marcel Breuer and completed in 1966. The building was updated by architects Beyer, Blinder Belle in 2014 for the Met.The works of the Met Breuer come from the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s collection and are both monographic and thematic exhibitions.

In 2018, the Met announced that it would be leaving the building in 2020 and that the Frick Collection would be moving in on a temporary basis for the renovation of their building starting in 2020.

(This information was provided by both the Met Breuer History and Wiki)

Met Breuer

The Met Breuer on March 2020

 

 

Japan Society    333 East 47th New York, NY 10017

Japan Society 333 East 47th New York, NY 10017

Japan Society

333 East 47th Street

New York, NY  10017

(212)  832-1155

https://www.japansociety.org/

Open: Monday-Friday 10:00am-6:00pm/Saturday & Sunday Closed

Fee: Depends on the event; See the website

 

I recently visited the Japan Society for the ‘Japan Cuts’ film festival 2019 to see four films as part of the festival. I had visited the Society years ago for a ‘Monsters’ exhibition which coincided with the dropping of the Atom Bomb. It was told to me during the tour of the exhibition that the Godzilla movies were the Japanese reaction to the dropping of the bombs and the effects of nuclear was on nature.

Japan Society III.jpg

The inside lobby  of the Japan Society

This time around it was a little more upbeat. I went to see new films by Japanese directors who are looking at contemporary culture a little more differently that film makers of the past. I was most impressed with “Dance with Me”, a light weight musical that reminded me of 1960’s musicals that came out in the United States and “Whole” about Japanese who come from mixed backgrounds and their role in society. It was nice to sit back and watch the films and participate in the Q & A’s.

Japan Society Film Festival

My favorite scene from “Dance with Me” “Happy Valley”

 

It was also nice to walk around the building to see the indoor gardens and pools that are located in the lobby area of the building. The building does have a feeling of Ying and Yang. There will be more exhibitions in the Fall.

Japan Society IV.jpg

The inside of the lobby of the Japan Society

 

 

The opening film “Dance with Me”

 

The Q & A at Japan Cuts for “Dance with Me”:

 

I recently visited the Japan Society for the “Made in Tokyo” exhibition on the development of architecture in the City of Tokyo between the 1962 and the 2020 Olympic Games. The exhibition showed the development and progress of the City since the bombings in WWII and how the City has rethought  the building and rebuilding of the City since.

Japan Society V

“Made in Tokyo”

Just like in the United States old department stores and office buildings are finding new use and older buildings in fringe and outside rural areas are becoming tech hubs. It was interesting so see how they were reworking old turn of the last century buildings and homes as incubators for the ‘computer age’.

Japan Society VII

The “Made in Japan” exhibition is closing at the Japan Society on January 26th, 2020. If you like the history of architecture this is an exhibition not to be missed.

Japan Society VI

The “Made in Tokyo” exhibition at the Japan Society

 

The Japan Society mission:

The Japan Society is a non-profit organization formed in 1907 to promote friendly relations between the United States and Japan. Its headquarters, the youngest landmark building in New York was designed by Junzo Yoshimura and opened in 1971 at 333 East 47th Street near the United Nations. With a focus on promoting “arts and culture, public policy, business, language and education,” the organization has regularly held events in its many facilities including a library, art gallery and theater since its opening. After suspending all activities during World War II, Japan Society expanded under the leadership of John D. Rockefeller III (Wiki).

History:

In 1907, Tamemoto Kuroki and Goro Ijuin were chosen to represent Japan at the Jamestown Exposition. They attended a welcome dinner in New York with Japanese ambassador to the United States, Shuzo Aoki, where there was talk of forming an organization to promote US-Japan relations in the city. Two days later at a luncheon held by Kuroki, Japan Society was born. The organization would be run by Aoki, then Honorary President of the Japan Society of the UK and John Huston Findley.

Japan Society spent the next forty years hosting events in honor of Japanese royalty, giving annual lectures on a wide range of topics and presenting art exhibits that drew in thousands of New Yorkers. In 1911, Lindsay Russell, another founding member of the society and later president, met with Emperor Meiji and spent his visit to Japan encouraging more societies to form there and throughout the United States.

Japan Society was soon incorporated under New York law and finally found a home near one of Russell’s work offices, though it continued to relocate throughout its history before its current headquarters was opened in 1971. At this time, Japan Society and its members began to express interest in improving teaching about Japan in the United States. The organization began sponsoring trips to the country, publishing books and sent a report to the Department of Education about the portrayal of Japan in American textbooks.

It remained active during World War I, operating as it had for the last seven years but the organization became more political when it began associating with the Anti-Alien Legislative Committee, an advocacy group that spoke out against yellow peril. Russell and Hamilton Holt, another founding member used the organization’s publication to defend all of Japan’s actions at the time. Unbeknownst to anyone at the time, even one of Japan Society’s writers secretly worked for the Japanese government with the task of improving Japan’s imagine in the United States. The organization eventually realized the dangers of taking sides and by 1924 stopped publishing any political commentary.

By the 1930’s, membership had dropped significantly due to financial difficulties and the Second Sino-Japanese War. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, Henry Waters Taft immediately resigned as president after serving  from 1922 to 1929 and again from 1934. Russell also stepped down as one of Japan Society’s directors. All activities were suspended and would not resume until the Treaty of San Francisco was signed in 1951.

John D. Rockefeller III served as president from 1952 to 1969 and then as Chairman of the Board until his death in 1978.  He accompanied John Foster Dulles on his trip to Japan that eventually led to the signing of the 1951 treaty. Rockefeller, a supporter of the Institute of Pacific Relations, who visited Japan in 1929 during one of its conferences, wanted to contribute to bettering US-Japan relations after the war and believed there needed to be non-governmental organizations like Japan Society in each country in order for such friendly relations to exist.

Under Rockefeller’s leadership, Japan Society expanded and talk began to find a permanent headquarters for it. It shared offices with another Rockefeller-led organization, Asia Society but as the two organizations continued to grow during the 1960’s,  it became increasingly clear that Japan Society needed its own building. After receiving donations from Rockefeller and other members, construction began on “Japan House” in 1967. Designed by Junzo Yoshimura, whose work also includes Asia Society’s headquarter, it became the first building in New York of contemporary Japanese architecture. On September 13, 1971, it was finally opened to the public after a ceremony attended by Prince Hitachi. He echoed Russell’s first words about Japan Society, calling for “closer people-to-people” contact between countries.

Japan Society II

Japan Society building

(This information was taken from Wiki and I give them full credit for the information. I also included information of Japan Society).

Ukrainian Institute of America  2 East 79th Street New York, NY 10021

Ukrainian Institute of America 2 East 79th Street New York, NY 10021

Ukrainian Institute of America

2 East 79th Street

New York, NY  10021

(212) 288-8660

https://ukrainianinstitute.org/

Open: Sunday 12:00pm-6:00pm/Monday Closed/ Tuesday-Saturday 12:00pm-6:00pm

Fee: Adults $8.00/ Seniors $6.00/ Students with current ID $4.00/Children under 12 Free/ Members Free

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d5953575-Reviews-Ukrainian_Institute_of_America-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

 

I was really impressed by the Ukrainian Institute of America on a recent visit. I must have passed this building a hundred times on my way to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and never thought twice of it. I was sorry  I did as you will miss a lot by not walking in. The galleries are really impressive and the main gallery on the bottom gives you an interesting look at the history of the Ukrainian.

The first floor gallery discusses the formation of the country, a bit about its history and its ties to Europe and to Russia, its religious past and the current state of affairs of the country including its recent split of the eastern sections of the country and Crimea to Russia. Its a country in turmoil considering they want to join the European Union. It is a country in flux and on the cusp of entering the 21st Century with some of its past still tugging at it. Like all countries, it will prevail on the will of it’s people. There is a lot of solid history here and a country ready to enter its future.

 

Ukrainian Institute II

The artwork of artist Vasyl Diadyniuk

The second and third floor galleries are full of art work from Ukrainian artists that is on sale and each of the galleries is dedicated to certain artists selling their works at somewhat hefty prices. Still you get to see the developments of the artists both here and abroad.

The forth floor is dedicated to special exhibitions. There are two shows going on now. One is by artist Vasyl Diadyniuk and another show is by artist Alexander Archipenko.

Ukrainian Institute III

The artwork of artist Alexander Archipenko

The Museum has an interesting history.

 

Ukrainian Institute of America History:

The Ukrainian Institute of America Inc. is a non-profit organization whose primary mission is to showcase and support Ukrainian culture. To that end, the Institute affords the general public an opportunity to learn about Ukraine and how the Ukrainian spirit expresses itself, with special emphasis on the creative arts.

Founded more than fifty years ago by William Dzus, a prominent Ukrainian industrialist and philanthropist, the Institute sponsors:

*Art exhibitions

*Music concerts

*film screenings

*theater presentations

*Poetry readings

*Lectures and symposia

*Educational programs

*Children’s events

*Documentation center

The history of the building:

The building that is home to the Institute, the National Historic Landmark Harry F. Sinclair House is one of the few remaining examples of the splendid mansions that prominent citizens of New York City built in the 19th Century. The mansion was built in 1897 for Isaac D. Fletcher, a wealthy banker and broker, by the architect C.P.H. Gilbert. Executed in Gothic Revival style, the building is richly decorated with intricate crockets, carvings, moldings, pinnacles and other exquisite details. Six stories high, partly surrounded by a dry moat, the Institute features stately rooms that are magnificently proportioned and lavishly finished (Institute History).

Ukranian Institute of America

The C.P.H. Gilbert house

In 1887, manufacturer, Isaac D. Fletcher, commissioned famed Gilded Age architect, C.P.H. Gilbert to design the mansion. When Mr. Fletcher died,  left this mansion and his art collection to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which sold it to Harry F. Sinclair, founder of Sinclair Oil Company and also famous for his involvement in the Teapot Dome affair. The last private owner was Augustus Van Horne Stuyvesant Jr., the last descendant of Peter Stuyvesant, who was the first governor of New Amsterdam, today’s New York City bought the house in 1930 and lived here with his sister, Anne. The house was sold as part of the estate when Mr. Stuyvesant died in 1953. The Ukrainian Institute of America acquired the mansion in 1955 (Institute History).

A key goal of the Institute is to continue to preserve this extraordinary fragment of the city’s history for the benefit of all citizens of New York. The house still retains its wooden moldings and the house looks as if its residents just moved out.

The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art         26 Wooster Street                New York, NY 10013

The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art 26 Wooster Street New York, NY 10013

The Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art

26 Wooster Street

New York, NY  10013

(212) 431-2609

LeslieLohman.org

HOME

Open: Sunday 12:00pm-6:00pm/Monday & Tuesday Closed/Wednesday 12:00pm-6:00pm/Thursday 12:00pm-8:00pm/Friday & Saturday 12:00pm-6:00pm

Fee: Suggested donation of $10.00

I recently visited the Leslie-Lohman Museum to see the second half of the “Art After Stonewall” exhibition that I saw at the Grey Gallery at New York University. The art is from just before the Gay Rights Movement just before the Stonewall Uprising and into the depths of the AIDS crisis of the early to mid-80’s.

It was interesting to see the perspective of people ‘coming out’ after the suppression of the 50’s and early 60’s and the wanting to conform to societies standards. People gravitated to the cities to find themselves and found an embracing community that was not always accepted by the status quo of the City. It was that suppression building up on conformity to be a certain type person that lead to riots, that being tired of being harassed all the time.

Leslie-Lohman Museum III

‘Art After Stonewall’ (picture of Devine)

There was a lot of lesbian art and the changes women felt at the time. Some was the changes in attitude and some of it was militant to the way the outside community treated these women. It was interesting to see the changes in less than a decade of how people saw themselves and the changes that people were capable of making.

Leslie-Lohman Museum II.jpg

‘Art After Stonewall’

The show closed on July 21st, 2019 but there are more shows in the future. The best part of the museum is that they have a suggested donation so if you do not have a lot of money it is a nice way to spend the afternoon and then explore SoHo and Chinatown.

 

History of the Leslie-Lohman Museum:

We can trace the origins of the Leslie-Lohman Museum back to the civil rights movement of the late 1960’s. In the moment of the Woodstock Music and Art Fair and the Stonewall Inn Uprising, gay art collectors Charles Leslie and Fritz Lohman presented their first exhibition in their SoHo loft in the summer of 1969. This weekend show featured downtown gay artists and was a complete success in attracting over 300 visitors-it because a seminal moment in the history of the Leslie-Lohman Museum and LGBTQ arts and culture.

In the midst of the 70’s gay liberation movement, our founders continued to collect and display the work of gay artists in various storefronts in SoHo while advocating for the preservation of the neighborhood, its unique architecture and the nascent community of artists living and working in its spacious lofts. Finally, settling in a basement gallery at 127-B Prince Street, this space became host to many art exhibitions and various cultural programs.

During the AIDS pandemic of the 80’s, Charles and Fritz created a refuge for ailing artists and their work. Along with providing care and lodging for them, they rescued the work of dying artists from families who, out of shame ignorance, wanted to destroy it. This led to the creation of the Leslie-Lohman Art Foundation in 1987 and to its ever-expanding collection of art. Through perseverance against the federal government, averse to approving a “gay art” organization, the foundation was finally granted tax-exempt in 1990.

Today, thanks to the hard work of generations of activities and artists, our community has gained greater visibility. However, the fight for our rights is not over. The foundation has transitioned into a museum that aims to preserve LGBTQ cultural identity and build community, reclaim scholarship from a queer artists and cultural workers. As we continue to stand at the intersection of art and social justice, we act as a cultural hub for LGBTQ individuals and their communities.

(Leslie-Lohman Museum pamphlet)

The Museum is a non-profit, emempt 501C3.