Category: College Art Gallery and Museum

Yale University Art Gallery                                 1111 Chapel Street                                              New Haven, CT 06510

Yale University Art Gallery 1111 Chapel Street New Haven, CT 06510

Yale University Art Gallery

1111 Chapel Street

New Haven, CT 06510

(203) 432-0600

https://artgallery.yale.edu/

Open: Sunday 10:00am-6:00pm/Monday-Thursday Closed/Friday 5:00pm-8:00pm/Saturday 10:00am-6:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g33851-d104343-Reviews-Yale_University_Art_Gallery-New_Haven_Connecticut.html

On a recent trip to New Haven, CT for the Yale versus Cornell game, I had enough time after the game to visit one of the University’s art museum’s that was located down the road from the stadium, the Yale University Art Museum. This four story museum displays the history of art from all over the world. It is by no means a small museum gallery and you will need more than one afternoon this very detailed museum.

The Yale University Art Gallery at 1111 Chapel Street

I started on the first floor with their Ancient Art galleries featuring items from digs that the university sponsored over 100 years ago. There are works from the Ancient Near East, Egypt and Europe from tiles from Mesopotamia to small idols from Egypt and funeral pieces from Europe beautifully displayed and lit. The gallery showed the level of sophistication of these societies and the advancement thousands of years ago. This lead to the Middle Ages Gallery showing the change of art after the fall of the Roman Empire.

The Ancient Galleries were a favorite of mine

Bypassing the other floors, I next ventured next to the “On the Basis of Art: 150 Years of Women at Yale”, a current exhibition that showcased the work of Alumni of the Fine Arts School of Yale whose works were influencing the art community all over the world.

The “On the Basis of Art” exhibition

The show “showcases and celebrates the remarkable achievement of an impressive roster of women artists who have graduated from Yale University. Presented on the occasion of the two major milestones, the 50th Anniversary of coeducation at Yale College and the 150th anniversary of the first women students at the University, who to study at the Yale School of the Fine Arts when it opened in 1869, the exhibition features works draws entirely from the collection of the Yale University Gallery that span a variety of media, such as painting, sculpture, drawings, prints, photography and video since 1891(Yale University website).

The exhibition spread over several galleries displaying all sorts of interesting art. What I enjoyed most was some of the contemporary drawings and sculpture. Their works were colorful and bold some of which I was impressed with the message the works were trying to portray. Some I understood and some I had to take a second look.

One of the works that really captured my attention was the work of a Black media artist from the 1970’s and her views of racism of always feeling like the only one in the room. It was a sensitive and very emotional viewpoint of a educated and sophisticated woman who always felt marginalized. It was a very honest approach to the work and you felt for her.

For the last half hour in the museum, I was able to quickly tour the each of the other galleries touring the Contemporary Galleries, the Asian Galleries, admiring some of the idols on display and then taking a quick tour of the African Galleries admiring masks and statuary.

View of the African art galleries, Yale University Art Gallery. Photo:  Jessica Smolinski - Picture of Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven -  Tripadvisor
Take your time to visit the galleries

You will need more than an hour to tour this museum and admire its works. I will be back in the future.

History of the Museum:

(from the Museum’s website)

The Yale University Art Gallery collects, preserves, studies and presents art in all media, from all regions of the globe and across time. The museum’s exceptional collection, numbering nearly 300,000 objects, is the core of its identity. It sustains and catalyzes all we do.

Founded in 1832, The Gallery is the oldest university art museum in America. Today, it is a center for teaching, learning and scholarship and is a preeminent cultural asset for Yale University, the wider academic community and the public. The museum is open to all, free of charge and is committed to engaging audiences through thoughtful, creative, and relevant exhibitions, programs and publications.

The Museum’s Collection:

The Gallery’s encyclopedic collection can engage every interest. Spanning one and a half city blocks and three buildings, the museum features more than 4,000 works on display as well as a rooftop terrace and a sculpture garden. Galleries showcase artworks from ancient times to the present, including vessels from Tang-dynasty China, early Italian paintings, textiles from Borneo, treasures from American art, masks from West Africa, modern and contemporary art, ancient sculptures, masterworks by Degas, Van Gogh and Picasso and more

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery  245 East 54th Street  New York, NY 10022

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery 245 East 54th Street New York, NY 10022

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery

245 East 54th  Street

New York, NY  10022

(212) 752-4340

http://www.artanddesignhs.org/

https://insideschools.org/school/02M630

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_School_of_Art_and_Design

Open: Seasonal when school is open and only at certain times of the year

Fee: Free-check in with the security guard

 

I passed the High School of Art & Design when I was touring the Turtle Bay neighborhood in Manhattan for my blog, MywalkinManhattan.com. The school was open during the Spring Break and some of the kids were in the school were taking classes. The security guard let me walk around and then he asked me would I like the see the art gallery. I said sure and I was able to explore the John B. Kenny Gallery.

John B. Kenny was Ceramist and an administrator who saved the school and created the school with three other artists in 1936. He founded the school with artists Henry Cordes, Mildred Harston and Jerod Magon.

High School of Art & Design V

The School History:

https://www.biblio.com/the-complete-book-of-pottery-by-kenny-john-b/work/59670

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/598110/pdf

 

 

The School Mission Statement:

The Mission of the High School of Art & Design is to inspire, educate and fully prepare our gifted students to become exceptional artists. Through a unified curriculum that incorporates a broad spectrum of disciplines integrating art, technology and academics, our students are prepared to go on to college and careers with industry-standard mastery in the major of their choice.

With a commitment to promoting strong ethical values and professional demeanor, we strive to foster a sense of community among our students, staff and parents. We are dedicated to engendering student’s productive, creative and innovative participation in the world of visual arts as concerned and caring citizens of the global community (School Mission Statement).

John B. Kenny artist

John B. Kenny artist

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/242318.John_B_Kenny

The Gallery is full with Alumni and student art and it revolves at various times of the year. It is a nice size gallery full of interesting art. There was a combination of sculpture, painting and paper sculpture in the gallery.

High School of Art and Design Gallery Show

The John B. Kenny Gallery is very interesting

I was only able to spend a short time in the gallery but it is a hidden gem tucked in the side of the main entrance and just talk to the security guards at the front of the school and they will let you tour on your own.

Check it out when the school reopens in the Fall.

 

Studio in a School NYC Gallery                     1 East 53rd Street New York, NY 10022

Studio in a School NYC Gallery 1 East 53rd Street New York, NY 10022

Studio in a School NYC Gallery LLC.

1 East 53rd Street

New York, NY  10022

(212) 459-1455

Home Page

Studio Institute

Studio in a School

Open: Sunday & Saturday Closed/Monday-Friday 8:00am-7:00pm

Fee: Free

My review on TripAdvisor:

 

 

1 East 53rd Street

The entrance to the Gallery is at 1 East 53rd Street

I came across this little gallery full of Public School K-12 art when walking around the Upper East Side for my walking project, “MywalkinManhattan.com” This small gallery space in the lobby of 1 East 53rd Street has a revolving exhibition of works from students in schools all over New York City.

Studio in the School Gallery IV

The revolving art at the Studio in a School Gallery is unique.

The art gallery revolves its art at different times of the year and you get to see the students creativity. There are paintings, sculptures and paperwork objects. It is amazing to see the talent the students have at all ages.

Studio in the School Gallery

These kids have talent

The best part of the gallery is that it is free. Just don’t try to go past the security guards at the desk and you will be fine. Take time to look at the over-hanging paper sculptures. They are very unique. Almost like a surrealist kite.

What is also nice is that it is free and only takes about 45 minutes to get through the whole gallery so it is a nice place to visit on a rainy day or on lunch hour.

 

Congratulations to the student artists.

History of the Studio in a School:

Studio in a School fosters the creative and intellectual development of New York City youth through quality visual arts program, directed by arts professionals. The organizer also collaborates with and develops the ability of those who provide or support arts programming and creative development for youth both in and outside of schools.

Studio in a School serves young people by integrating the visual arts into teaching and learning and provides professional development for artists and teachers.

In 1977, during a financial crisis in New York City, public school arts education budgets were dramatically cut. In response, Agnes Gund, philanthropist and President Emerita of The Museum of Modern Art, founded Studio in a School.

Today, under Ms. Gund’s leadership, together with the support of many, our programs continue to thrive, bringing visual arts education taught by professional artists to students in New York City and beyond. We fulfill out mission through two divisions: the NYC Schools Program, offering programs for students in Pre-K through high school and the Studio Institute, which shares professional learning, partnership programs, arts internships and research grants in local and national forums.

Disclaimer: This information was taken from the Studio in a School website and I give them full credit for the information.

Museum of Contemporary Art                 333 North Laura Street              Jacksonville, Florida 32202

Museum of Contemporary Art 333 North Laura Street Jacksonville, Florida 32202

Museum of Contemporary Art

333 North Laura Street

Jacksonville, Florida 32202

(904) 366-6911

https://mocajacksonville.unf.edu/

Open: Sunday 12:00pm-5:00pm/Monday Closed/Tuesday & Wednesday 11:00am-5:00pm/ Thursday 11:00am-9:00pm/ Friday & Saturday 11:00am-5:00pm

Fee: Adults $8.00/Students, Seniors & Military $5.00/Children 2-12 $5.00/Children under 2 Free

 

On a recent visit to Jacksonville, Florida I visited the Museum of Contemporary Art in downtown Jacksonville. It was such a nice experience and for such a small museum it had some interesting pieces of art and some unique gallery exhibits.

MOCA II.jpg

The galleries are very interesting

In the Atrium area of the museum as you walk up the steps to the second floor, the giant sculpture, “The Fragility of the Promise” by artist Kedgar Volta sways and moves as you walk up the flights. The piece was quoted as that “the installation is the artist’s inquiry into the fluctuating interactions between our internal narratives and the external forces of culture and commerce. The fragility of the connection becomes a testament to the elusive promise of prosperity” (Gallery Newsletter). I didn’t see all that but what I saw was a piece that made interesting lights and sounds and when you walked under it you saw the complexity of what the artist was trying to do. It is a spectacular piece of art.

MOCA I.jpg

“The Fragility of the Promise” by artist Kedgar Volta

In partnership with the University of North Florida-Jacksonville, I got to see the faculty exhibition with works from some of the working professors. I walked through the ‘Jay Shoots: Home” exhibition which shows the artist’s work in photography and structure of design in his works. Some were small boxes with pictures and others were small sculptures with superimposed shots.

The museum quotes his work as “while these are hybrid works, or photo sculptures, retain the artist’s sense of formal beauty, they also display his humorous side as he explores the concept of the dwelling, how we create our sense of place, personally and collectively”. They are small interesting works that you have to see up close.

On the Third Floor, was the Special Exhibition Galleries featuring the exhibition “A Moment in Beijing: Su Xinping, Weng Yunpeng and Jizi”. These artists from China, represent the spectrum from young and old and give their take on paining and photography. Some of the works offer unusual color and design. Some pieces were somewhat unrecognizable while others used their sense of movement to show what the artist was trying to portray. You really have to look at the works for a second time.

On the top floor is the Education Gallery where students take art classes and there is a nice studio for kids and students to do their work. It was quiet the afternoon I was there.

MOCA Jacksonville, FL.jpg

The MOCO at Hemming Square

On the ground floor is the restaurant and I have to say that it smells up the museum. The afternoon I toured the museum, the place smelled like burnt toast and grilled cheese. Very unusual for a Contemporary Art Museum but maybe that’s what brings in the patrons. Still I enjoyed my afternoon here and it only takes about an hour and a half to tour the whole facility.

History of the Museum of Contemporary Art-Jacksonville:

The Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville is also known is a contemporary art museum in Jacksonville, Florida funded and operated as a “cultural institute” of the University of North Florida. One of the largest contemporary art institutions in the Southeastern United States, it presents exhibition by international, national and regional artists.

MOCO Jacksonville was founded in 1924 as the Jacksonville Fine Arts Society, the first organization in the Jacksonville community devoted to the visual arts. In 1948, the Museum was incorporated as the Jacksonville Art Museum and in 1978 it became the first institution in Jacksonville to be accredited by the American Alliance of Museum.

In late 1999, the Museum acquired its permanent home, the historic Western Union Telegraph Building on Hemming Plaza, built by the Auchter Company, adjacent to the newly renovated City Hall and became the Jacksonville Museum of Modern Art (JMOMA). In 2000, a series of preview exhibitions opened in a temporary  exhibition space while the building facade was restored to its original Art Deco style. The interior was completely refurbished to house the Museum’s galleries, educational facilities, a theater/auditorium, Museum Shop and Cafe Nola.

After moving to its downtown location, the Museum experienced rapid growth in both membership and the size of the permanent collection. The many substantial additions to the collection increased not only its quality but also its size to almost 800 pieces. After completing a recent review of the current scope of the Museum’s collection and exhibitions, discussions were held regarding the distinctions between modern and contemporary arts as well as the Museum’s mission and vision for the future. It was decided that in order for the Museum  to convey strong sense of identity and purpose to both the community and other art institutions across the country, its name should change. In November of 2006, the JMOMA became the Museum of Contemporary Art Jacksonville.

The University of North Florida acquired the museum in 2009 to act as a cultural resource of the university.

(Wiki and MOCA Museum History 2019)

Disclaimer: I took this information from a combination of the MOCA History and Wiki and I give them full credit for this information.