Tag: Exploring Salem NJ

Pinesgrove-Woodstown Historical Society                               42 North Main Street                                                 Woodstown, NJ 08098

Pinesgrove-Woodstown Historical Society 42 North Main Street Woodstown, NJ 08098

Pinesgrove-Woodstown Historical Society

42 North Main Street

Woodstown, NJ. 08098

(856) 769-1886

https://www.facebook.com/people/Pilesgrove-Woodstown-Historical-Society-Museum/100057781264630/?ref=py_c

Open: Sunday-Friday Closed/Saturday 10:00am-1:00pm

My review on TripAdvisor:

The Samuel Dickeson House

The Mission of the Pilesgrove-Woodstown Historical Society:

To preserve and advance interest in and awareness of the history and heritage of the Borough of Woodstown and Pilesgrove Township by properly procuring, preserving and maintaining the art, artifacts and documents that relate to the cultural, archaeological, civil, literary, genealogical and ecclesiastical history of the local community. We welcome researchers and provide them with any available material.

On the site is the 1840’s one room schoolhouse that was moved from Eldridge’s Hill in the 1970’s and is open for touring during museum hours. The organization hosts quarterly presentations and participates with the Candlelight Tour on the first Friday of December.

Touring the house is a wonderful experience and I got an excellent tour from a member of the Board of Directors who took me on a full tour of the house and grounds. She explained that the volunteers take a lot of pride in the home, the displays and the artifacts and antiques that make up the décor of the house. The tour starts in the Library which is to the right of the entrance. This is where people can research their families and the towns’ histories. The house was originally owned by the Dickerson family and had changed hands many times over the years.

The Library:

This display has the portrait of John Fenwick and the family tree

The Library:

The Library:

The collection of books and manuscripts is held in the library of the home. Patrons can do their research on their family trees and on the local towns here.

The Living Room:

The Living Room:

The Living Room:

The Living Room:

The Living Room:

The Kitchen:

The kitchen had been modernized over the years but still retains its historic look to it.

The Kitchen:

The Kitchen:

The Kitchen:

The kitchen:

The Military Room:

Memorabilia from the Veterans of Foreign Wars

The Upstairs Bedrooms:

The Upstairs bedroom:

The Upstairs bedroom:

The Upstairs bedroom:

The upstairs bedroom has lots of children’s toys, clothes and musical instruments.

The Upstairs bedroom:

The Upstairs bedroom:

The hats and toy collections in the home.

The Bathroom:

The Commercial section of the home:

The outside grounds have a wonderful lawn area where the foliage was in full hilt when I was visiting and in the back of the home is the schoolhouse from the 1840’s. This was locked for the day, but I could see the classroom set up of an old-fashioned school room that has not changed all that much since that period.

The Schoolhouse on the society’s property

The Schoolhouse

The property behind the house was beautiful and well-kept with colorful foliage.

The house is well maintained, beautifully displayed with artifacts and there is a lot to see and do here. I just wish this wonderful site was open more often so that people could enjoy these wonderful artifacts and displays.

Day Two Hundred and Forty Visiting the Historical Sites of Southern New Jersey in Cumberland and Salem Counties-A Local Journey on Father’s Day Weekend                                                             June 18th-19th, 2022

Day Two Hundred and Forty Visiting the Historical Sites of Southern New Jersey in Cumberland and Salem Counties-A Local Journey on Father’s Day Weekend June 18th-19th, 2022

Grab your tour book and get in the car to visit all these wonderful sites. There is so much to see and do in Historical Southern New Jersey!

The Nicolas Gibbon House

mywalkinmanhattan

The one thing I refuse to do on Father’s Day is to spend the day at the cemetery. I know that is some people’s idea of honoring one’s family members but it is not mine. I went on Friday and paid my respects to my father (whom this blog is dedicated to) and spent time remembering some of the good times we had in past. I dropped some cut flowers from our gardens (some of which he planted) and said a small prayer. Then I left.

My idea of honoring my father and spending Father’s Day with him is to do something that we would have shared together. We were always running around somewhere and exploring something new and doing something fun. That is how I wanted to honor him. By being active and giving him a toast at Sunday dinner.

I had gotten a pamphlet on the historical sites…

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Salem Oak/Friends Burial Ground                                         112 West Broadway (Route 49)                                          Salem, NJ 08079

Salem Oak/Friends Burial Ground 112 West Broadway (Route 49) Salem, NJ 08079

Salem Oak/Friends Burial Ground

112 West Broadway (Route 49)

Salem, NJ 08079

(859) 935-3381

https://www.findagrave.com/cemetery/1997710/salem-friends-burial-ground

Open: Sunday-Saturday Dawn to Dusk

Admission: Free

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g46799-d24137617-r844157468-Salem_Oak_friends_Burial_Cemetery-Salem_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

The Salem Oak Cemetery in Downtown Salem, NJ

There is a true beauty to a historical cemetery with its old tombstones, its interesting artwork on the grave sites and the history behind the famous families who are buried there whose homes we tour and roads and parks that are named after them. The cemetery is located right in Downtown Salem, which serves as the County Seat for the County of Salem.

It was also home to one of the oldest oak trees in the country which fell in 2019. The over 500 year old oak tree has been part of the original virgin forest and is said to where town founder, John Fenwick, met with the Lenape Indians for the establishment of a settlement and for peaceful negotiations.

The family plots at the Salem Oak Cemetery

All that is left of the tree now is the rotting stump but three of its saplings still exist on the grounds and they look about two hundred years old. They grow majestically amongst the gravesites.

The family plots line the aisles at the cemetery

Inside the cemetery, the graves bear the names of founding fathers of the Town of Salem and prominent families who once made up the population with names such as Thompson, Reeves, Abbott, Wister, Bacon, Griscom, Waddington, Sickler, Lippencott, Goodwin, Bullock, Woodnutt and Bassett.

You will see these names on artifacts in the Salem Historical Society such as clothes, business document and household items. There names and influence still hold a position in the community.

The Salem Oak in the Friends Burial Ground before it fell in 2019 (Salem County Historical Society)

This is the spot where founder John Fenwick met with the Lenape Indians in 1675.

Take time to walk amongst the family plots and pay your respects to these important families who were once the founding members of both the community and of the great State of New Jersey.

The Friends Burial Ground plaque

The cemetery’s spot in Downtown Salem, NJ

The Salem Oak Cemetery in Downtown Salem, NJ

The cemetery is part of the Women’s Heritage Trail

Quinton’s Bridge at Alloways Creek                                     Route 49 at Quinton-Alloway Road                                   Salem, NJ 08079

Quinton’s Bridge at Alloways Creek Route 49 at Quinton-Alloway Road Salem, NJ 08079

Quinton’s Bridge at Alloways Creek

Route 49 at Quinton-Alloway Road

Salem, NJ 08079

No Phone Number

https://www.revolutionarywarnewjersey.com/new_jersey_revolutionary_war_sites/towns/quinton_nj_revolutionary_war_sites.htm

https://www.hmdb.org/m.asp?m=88443

Open: Sunday-Saturday 24 hours

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/ShowUserReviews-g46799-d24137890-r844180359-Quinton_s_Bridge_At_Alloways_Creek-Salem_New_Jersey.html?m=19905

If you blink your eye, you will pass this bridge along the Alloway Creek just outside of Alloway, NJ, a sleepy little town just outside the County seat of Salem, NJ. What may seem like just a bridge with an historical marker once held a big place in the history of the Revolutionary War for this part of New Jersey. This was once a major travel and transport point during the area’s heyday of the farming industry in the early part of the country’s history, supplying food for the Philadelphia and lower New Jersey area.

Today the Alloway Creek is used more for fishing and recreation from I saw the afternoon I visited the site but once upon a time, this was a busy throughfare for travel. The creek was used for transport and the road was a crossways between all the small communities in the area.

Take time to stop in the parking lot next to the bridge and take a look at the significance of this area and what this meant in the context of the war years.

Alloway Creek today in 2022

History of Quinton’s Bridge at Alloway Creek:

(From Revolutionary War New Jersey.com):

In March of 1778, a group of about 1500 British troops under the command of Charles Mawhood occupied the town of Salem. Their objective was to confiscate cattle, hay and corn to bring across the Delaware River to Philadelphia, which was then controlled by the British.

Local citizen had moved some of the cattle south of Salem, past Alloways Creek to keep it from the British. Alloways Creek extends abou thirty miles inland from the Delaware River, creating a natural southern boundary that could only be crossed at three bridges in the area; Quinton’s Bridge, Hancock’s Bridge about four miles east of here and Thompson’s Bridge about five miles to the west. Salem and Cumberland County militiamen took positions at the bridges to stop the British from moving past them.

The British made an attack on Quinton’s Bridge on March 18th. During the attack, the British lured about 200-300 of the militamen across the bridge into an ambush feigning a retreat. The British had actually hidden some of their soldiers in a house near the creek and when the militiamen moved past them, the soldiers rushed out of the house to cut off the militiamen’s retreat to the bridge. Militiamen were captured or killed but their defense of the bridge held and the British were not able to cross Alloways Creak at Quinton’s Bridge.

Three days later an attack was made on the militiamen at Hancock’s Bridge in which militiamen were bayoneted to death in their sleep in a nearby house.