Category: Walking the Upper East Side

Central Park Zoo  Fifth Avenue and East 64th Street New York, NY 10021

Central Park Zoo Fifth Avenue and East 64th Street New York, NY 10021

Central Park Zoo

Fifth Avenue and East 64th Street

New York, NY 10021

(212) 439-6500

https://centralparkzoo.com/

Open: Sunday-Saturday 10:00am-4:30pm

Fee: Adults $12.00/Seniors (65+) $10.00/Children (3-12)$8.00/Total Experience Adults $16.00/Seniors (65+) $15.00/Children (3-12) $12.00

My review on TripAdvisor:

https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attraction_Review-g60763-d267703-Reviews-Central_Park_Zoo-New_York_City_New_York.html?m=19905

I love coming to the Central Park Zoo when I am visiting the Upper East Side. The zoo is a nice to just relax and reflect from the hustle and bustle of the City. On a quiet midweek day, there is nothing like going to the 2:00pm seal feeding at all times of the year. The seals get so excited and the humans like seeing the seals in their playful mood.

The Seal feedings are a lot of fun.

The zoo is small so touring it will only take about an hour or so to see all the exhibitions. You have a choice of seeing the monkeys, the birds, the seals and the penguins. They finally moved the polar bear out of the zoo a few years ago and he always looked so bored with his life. He would give you a look like ‘get me out of here’.

The Central Park Zoo is set up with different exhibitions.

The smaller animals like the monkeys and the penguins look like they are having more fun in their enclosed homes with more room to move around. They always look at us as visitors in an amusing way like why are we so interested in them. It is an interesting interaction with the animals there to see their reaction to us.

There is also more birds, amphibians and bats to see in other exhibitions around the zoo and smaller outside areas to view the smaller animals such as pandas and leopards that have finally been given space to roam around.

The penguin exhibition

There is also a nice gift shop just outside the zoo and the Dancing Crane Cafe is the zoo restaurant which is over-priced and the food the few times I have tried it was mediocre. It is not like the cafe up at the Bronx Zoo that was pretty decent.

Don’t miss the hourly concert at Delacorte Clock when the animal sculptures dance to the music played. It is such an enjoyable experience.

The Delacorte Clock that plays music hourly

History of the Zoo:

The Zoo was not originally part of the layout for Central Park when designed by Fredrick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux. A small menagerie developed on the edge of the park with exotic animals that had been donated to the park starting with a bear cub tied to a tree in 1859 and a monkey in 1860. Other animals came later including cranes, a peacock and a goldfish.

The original menagerie

In 1860, the American Zoological and Botanical Society wanted to create a zoo somewhere in New York City. In 1864, the zoo received a formal charter, making it the second publicly owned zoo behind the Philadelphia Zoo. Though a formal zoo had not yet been created, the menagerie, with its free admission and good location made it the most popular attraction in Central Park.

By the 1930’s, the menagerie had become run down and was not sufficient to hold the animals. In 1834, Mayor Fiorello La Guardia hired Robert Moses to head the unified Parks Department and a new more formal zoo was created. The new zoo was opened on December 2nd, 1934 and by 1936 over six million people had visited the zoo.

By 1967, the zoo was again falling apart due to years of negligence and budget cuts. New York City’s fiscal crisis had affected the Parks System and conditions had gone downhill. In 1980, The Wildlife Conservatory (the former NY Zoological Society) signed a fifty year agreement in April of that year and started a renovation of the zoo from 1982 to its opening in 1988.

When the Zoo opened in August of 1988, the concept of the zoo had changed. The Wildlife Conservation Society had taken over the Queens Zoo, the Prospect Park Zoo in Brooklyn and already had possession of the Bronx Zoo and the direction of the society was toward conservation and care of animals while the Prospect Zoo was to be used as a Children’s Zoo and the Queens Zoo would concentrate on North American animals. The Children’s Zoo next to the Central Park Zoo went through its own renovation in the late 1990’s and is now called the Tisch Children’s Zoo after businessman, Laurence Tisch who had donated most of the money for the renovation.

The structures and concept of what a zoo is has changed over the years.

(This information was taken from both Wiki and the Central Park Zoo History)

Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial House 47-49 East 65th Street  New York, NY 10065

Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial House 47-49 East 65th Street New York, NY 10065

Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial House

47-49 East 65th Street

New York, NY  10065

(212) 650-3174

Roosevelt House History

Sara Delano Roosevelt Library

Open: To Groups on Fridays and Saturdays and to individuals on Saturdays 10:00am/12:00pm/2:00pm

Fee: Free to Individuals/Donations welcome-Groups tours are $100.00 for up to five people with an additional $15.00 fee per person. There is also an administration fee of $25.00 for groups over 20 people.

 

It is amazing what you discover when you are walking around the Upper East Side of Manhattan. I was exploring the Streets of the Upper East Side for my blog, ‘MywalkinManhattan’ and when walking around the Hunter College Campus came across the Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial House at 47-49 East 65th Street.

This beautiful brownstone was built as a wedding present to Franklin Delano Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor and their future family by his mother Sara Delano Roosevelt. It was their New York City residence until they moved to the White House. His mother continued to use the house until her death in 1941 when the home was sold to Hunter College.

Tours are available when the building is open (Hunter College is currently closed) and you can tour the whole house. The home was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

History of the Sara Delano Roosevelt Memorial House:

The Neo-Georgian townhouse was designed by architect Charles A. Platt for Sara Ann Delano Roosevelt in 1907. It originally held “two mirror-image residences with a single facade and entrance. Each floor had its own front reception room with a welcoming fireplace. Rear parlous could be combined through sliding doors

Sara Delano Roosevelt House III

The mansion at 47-49 East 65th Street on the Upper East Side

The house was given to the Roosevelt’s by Franklin’s mother as a wedding gift for them. The house originally two homes and Franklin’s mother had doors put in place so she could enter their part of the home whenever she wanted. The house was used by Sara Ann Delano Roosevelt from its completion in 1908 to her death in 1941 and intermittently by the Roosevelts until the sale to Hunter College in 1943.

Sara Delano Roosevelt House II

The house historical marker

After his mother’s death in 1941, President Roosevelt and his wife placed the house up for sale and a non-profit consortium was organized to purchase the house on behalf of Hunter College.

Sara Delano Roosevelt House IV

The Extended Roosevelt family

The house was closed in 1992 and reopened in 2010 after an $18 million renovation. Leslie E Robertson Associates was the structural engineers on this renovation. The building is currently used by Hunter College as the Roosevelt House Public Policy Institute at Hunter College or just known as the Roosevelt House.

Sara Delano Roosevelt House

The inside of the house’s museum

(Disclaimer: This information was from Wiki and I give them full credit for the History of the Roosevelt House).

Video’s Related to the House on YouTube:

Visiting the Roosevelt House:

 

The History of the House:

 

 

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery  245 East 54th Street  New York, NY 10022

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery 245 East 54th Street New York, NY 10022

High School of Art & Design-John B. Kenny Gallery

245 East 54th  Street

New York, NY  10022

(212) 752-4340

http://www.artanddesignhs.org/

https://insideschools.org/school/02M630

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_School_of_Art_and_Design

Open: Seasonal when school is open and only at certain times of the year

Fee: Free-check in with the security guard

 

I passed the High School of Art & Design when I was touring the Turtle Bay neighborhood in Manhattan for my blog, MywalkinManhattan.com. The school was open during the Spring Break and some of the kids were in the school were taking classes. The security guard let me walk around and then he asked me would I like the see the art gallery. I said sure and I was able to explore the John B. Kenny Gallery.

John B. Kenny was Ceramist and an administrator who saved the school and created the school with three other artists in 1936. He founded the school with artists Henry Cordes, Mildred Harston and Jerod Magon.

High School of Art & Design V

The School History:

https://www.biblio.com/the-complete-book-of-pottery-by-kenny-john-b/work/59670

https://muse.jhu.edu/article/598110/pdf

 

 

The School Mission Statement:

The Mission of the High School of Art & Design is to inspire, educate and fully prepare our gifted students to become exceptional artists. Through a unified curriculum that incorporates a broad spectrum of disciplines integrating art, technology and academics, our students are prepared to go on to college and careers with industry-standard mastery in the major of their choice.

With a commitment to promoting strong ethical values and professional demeanor, we strive to foster a sense of community among our students, staff and parents. We are dedicated to engendering student’s productive, creative and innovative participation in the world of visual arts as concerned and caring citizens of the global community (School Mission Statement).

John B. Kenny artist

John B. Kenny artist

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/242318.John_B_Kenny

The Gallery is full with Alumni and student art and it revolves at various times of the year. It is a nice size gallery full of interesting art. There was a combination of sculpture, painting and paper sculpture in the gallery.

High School of Art and Design Gallery Show

The John B. Kenny Gallery is very interesting

I was only able to spend a short time in the gallery but it is a hidden gem tucked in the side of the main entrance and just talk to the security guards at the front of the school and they will let you tour on your own.

Check it out when the school reopens in the Fall.

 

Studio in a School NYC Gallery                     1 East 53rd Street New York, NY 10022

Studio in a School NYC Gallery 1 East 53rd Street New York, NY 10022

Studio in a School NYC Gallery LLC.

1 East 53rd Street

New York, NY  10022

(212) 459-1455

Home Page

Studio Institute

Studio in a School

Open: Sunday & Saturday Closed/Monday-Friday 8:00am-7:00pm

Fee: Free

My review on TripAdvisor:

 

 

1 East 53rd Street

The entrance to the Gallery is at 1 East 53rd Street

I came across this little gallery full of Public School K-12 art when walking around the Upper East Side for my walking project, “MywalkinManhattan.com” This small gallery space in the lobby of 1 East 53rd Street has a revolving exhibition of works from students in schools all over New York City.

Studio in the School Gallery IV

The revolving art at the Studio in a School Gallery is unique.

The art gallery revolves its art at different times of the year and you get to see the students creativity. There are paintings, sculptures and paperwork objects. It is amazing to see the talent the students have at all ages.

Studio in the School Gallery

These kids have talent

The best part of the gallery is that it is free. Just don’t try to go past the security guards at the desk and you will be fine. Take time to look at the over-hanging paper sculptures. They are very unique. Almost like a surrealist kite.

What is also nice is that it is free and only takes about 45 minutes to get through the whole gallery so it is a nice place to visit on a rainy day or on lunch hour.

 

Congratulations to the student artists.

History of the Studio in a School:

Studio in a School fosters the creative and intellectual development of New York City youth through quality visual arts program, directed by arts professionals. The organizer also collaborates with and develops the ability of those who provide or support arts programming and creative development for youth both in and outside of schools.

Studio in a School serves young people by integrating the visual arts into teaching and learning and provides professional development for artists and teachers.

In 1977, during a financial crisis in New York City, public school arts education budgets were dramatically cut. In response, Agnes Gund, philanthropist and President Emerita of The Museum of Modern Art, founded Studio in a School.

Today, under Ms. Gund’s leadership, together with the support of many, our programs continue to thrive, bringing visual arts education taught by professional artists to students in New York City and beyond. We fulfill out mission through two divisions: the NYC Schools Program, offering programs for students in Pre-K through high school and the Studio Institute, which shares professional learning, partnership programs, arts internships and research grants in local and national forums.

Disclaimer: This information was taken from the Studio in a School website and I give them full credit for the information.